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Coach Conduct and End-of-Game Management

The following information was presented at IAABO 31’s board meeting on Feb 4, 2018.

 

Dealing with Coach Conduct

  • I have seen a lot of unacceptable coach conduct this season in High School and Suburban games, but I have not seen a lot of officials who deal with that behavior effectively.
  • REMEMBER:  Coaches may NOT coach while completely out of the coaching box.
    • Too often, officials say “As long as he’s not bothering me, I don’t care where the coach is”.
  • Coaches may NOT voice disagreement across the court.
    • Too often, officials say, “I don’t want to insert myself into the game at that point. He’s just making himself look bad”
  • These are not appropriate responses to poor coach behavior. The behavior MUST be addressed.
  • How can we EFFECTIVELY address poor coach conduct?
  • What’s in your “toolbox”?
    • Your voice. You can try to talk to the coach.
      • “Coach, I need you to help me out and find your box.”
      • “Coach, by rule. . . “
      • “Coach, my partner had a great look. He’ll tell you what he saw if you ask.”
    • Unofficial warning
      • “Coach, I’ve heard enough.”
      • “I’ve given my answer, coach. We’re done talking”
      • “Coach, your assistant is about to lose your box for you.”
    • Official warning
      • New this year. USE IT. It’s a great tool.  It gets the coach to realize the situation without a T.
      • Tell the coach, tell the table, have it recorded in the book.
    • Technical foul
      • No one enjoys giving technical fouls, but it’s just a call.
      • You’re not inserting yourself into the game. You’re simply assessing the penalty that the rules require.
      • If you’ve gone through the other tools, no one will be surprised by the T.
      • Call it and get away.
      • Be professional, not emotional.
  • Effective management of coaches is what sets great officials apart from great play-callers. Don’t ignore this part of your game.

 

End of Game Management

 

 

  • Last 2 minutes: “Let’s be perfect”. FOCUS
    • See the WHOLE play: start, middle, and finish.
    • Get a shooter, every time.
    • If time-out is called, let’s be sure there’s possession before blowing the whistle.
  • Be strong in your primary, including off-ball and rebounding responsibilities.
    • Help if needed outside your primary: be LATE, be RIGHT, be NEEDED.
  • Game awareness. We must know:
    • Bonus situation
    • Arrow
    • Time-outs remaining
  • Move to improve.
    • Don’t get stuck in one spot
    • Always try to find a position to see “through” the play, regardless of whether you’re Lead, Trail or Center.
  • Communicate during time-outs!
    • With table:
    • double-check time-outs remaining
    • team fouls
    • running score (check with visitor’s book)
  • With partner(s):
    • Do we have a problem player?
    • Last shot responsibilities
    • How is ball being put back in play?
    • Do we need to adjust anything at this point?

 

  • Last minute:
    • Keep officiating. Don’t put away the whistles.
    • Strategic Fouling – POE
    • Have a count, in case of timing error.
    • NCAA officials: remember timing rules.
  • Last shot:
    • Primary responsibility is
      • Trail official in a 2-whistle game
      • Official opposite the table (could be C or T) in a 3-whistle game.
    • Let’s ALL have an opinion.
    • If it’s so close that we can’t decide, we can consult the timer. If we disagree, the Referee will make the final decision.
  • Whistle or no whistle?
    • IAABO does not require a whistle at the end of the period.
    • The only time I would recommend a whistle at the end of the period is if the last-second try is very close to the horn and you want to wave it off.
    • Any other use of the whistle could cause participants to think you are making a call.
  • Post-Game Handshake Reminders
    • You are required to observe the teams. You are not required to participate.
    • If you have an unsporting technical foul, you are excused from the protocol.